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Popular Destinations

Batumi

Lying on the Black Sea Coast, close to the Turkish border Batumi is the largest city in the region and Georgia’s main port. The name is derived from the Greek “bathys limen” meaning “deep harbour”. Its graceful white architecture and subtropical vegetation make it unique among Georgian cities and a magnet for foreign visitors and Georgians alike. The city is also famous for its Botanical Gardens founded in 1912 and stretching over 120 hectares. The gardens are divided into nine geographical zones harbouring over 5000 different plant species brought here from all over the world.

Batumi, Georgia

Abastumani Observatory

The Abastumani Observatory is the first mountain observatory in the former Soviet Union located high up amongst steep hills at 1650m. Here through the powerful telescope you can clearly see the surface of the Moon and even of Saturn and Jupiter.

Georgia

Vardzia

Vardzia is a huge cave complex that once consisted of some 3000 caves and could house around 50,000 people. It was built during the reign of Queen Tamar, a great ruler of 12th century Georgia. Vardzia is a place of wonders – artfully carved caves connected by long tunnels, all   hewn by hand over 800 years ago, a natural cold-water spring trickling from the rock-face, beautiful frescoes still as bright as the day they were first painted. The cave town survived earthquakes and invasions and once again houses a working monastery.

Georgia

Sighnaghi

The fortified town of Sighnaghi lies high up on the ridge overlooking the Alazani valley. The defensive walls and 23 towers were built by King Erekle II in the 18th century against the Lezgian invasion. Little has changed here for the last 200 years. The town preserved its original image and now offers visitors stunning views of the surrounding Caucasus Mountains.

Georgia

David Gareja

David Gareja Cave Monastery was founded in the 6th century by David, one of the 13 Syrian Fathers who preached Christianity to the Georgian people. The complex is located in the semi-desert and consists of 19 monasteries. The most ancient is Lavra Monastery holding the tomb of Father David, while the painted caves of Udabno Monastery look out over a starkly beautiful landscape of striated valleys and windswept ridges giving stunning views over to neighbouring Azerbaijan.

Georgia

Gori & Uplistsikhe

The town of Gori is located in the very heart of Georgia. Gori is known to have been besieged by the Roman general Pompey in 65 BC. The 7th-century fortress of Goris-Tsikhe still dominates the town. But probably Gori is best famous (or perhaps infamous) as the birthplace of one of the 20th century’s most controversial leaders - Joseph Jughashvili, better known as Joseph Stalin, the “Man of Steel”. Today he is still revered in his hometown as the greatest leader the USSR ever had, yet elsewhere his reign is regarded as an evil nightmare. In Gori you can visit the Stalin Museum, the tiny house where he was born and his private bullet proof railway carriage.

 

Uplistsikhe is the oldest cave town in Georgia. Back in the first millennium BC it was a flourishing city situated on the great east-west trade route, the Silk Road. Visitors can still walk among the ancient streets, rock-carved theatre, royal halls, pharmacy, pagan temples and Christian churches, while the remains of granaries and large clay wine vessels give us some clue as to the daily life of the inhabitants.

Georgia

Tusheti

Area: 896 sq. m.

Population: 2980

Main village: Omalo

Tusheti is one of the most beautiful and remote mountain regions of Georgia. Situated in the depth of huge mountains Tusheti is isolated from the rest of Georgia in winter. The isolation makes it unique with nature, traditions and people with their lovely dialect, delicious dishes, famed Tushetian cheese and songs of Tushetian women playing on a harmonic.

Georgia

Khevsureti Province

Area: 1500 sq.km.

Population: 3200

Main village: Shatili

This is a historic province in East Georgia well-known for its fortified villages. In order to protect their villages locals built their houses very close to each other so that the houses formed one single fortification. The most spectacular villages are Shatili, Mutso and Ardoti – now mostly abandoned but proudly overlooking the area if though they’re still there to guard their land and people.

Georgia

Khevi Province

Area: 1081,7 sq. km.

Population: 3 478

Main town: Kazbegi (Stepantsminda)

The landscape of this northeastern province is dominated by alpine meadows dotted with mountain passes.  Khevi is home to one of the highest peaks in Georgia – Mt Kazbegi (5047m) (legend says Zeus has chained Prometheus to it). Since ancient times, Khevi has been of great strategic and military importance as one of the main routes connecting North and South Caucasus used to pass here.

Georgia

Adjara Province

ACHARA

Batumi – Lying on the Black Sea Coast, close to the Turkish border Batumi is the largest city in the region and Georgia’s main port. The name is derived from the Greek “bathys limen” meaning “deep harbour”. Its graceful white architecture and subtropical vegetation make it unique among Georgian cities and a magnet for foreign visitors and Georgians alike.

The city is also famous for its Botanical Gardens founded in 1912 and stretching over 120 hectares. The gardens are divided into nine geographical zones harbouring over 5000 different plant species brought here from all over the world.

Gonio Fortress (1st century AD) was once a large Roman-Byzantine military settlement and an important strategic point along the Black Sea coast. It was occupied intermittently by Romans, Byzantines and Ottomans. More importantly it is connected with the myth of the Argonauts and the Golden Fleece. This is why the famous German archaeologist Schliemann was so fascinated by the fortress and wanted to begin excavations of the area in the 1850s, but was refused permission by the government of the Russian Tsar.

Batumi, Georgia